Conscious Living

Stop Asian Hate: Resources to Educate and Empower Allies

This year we’ve seen a rise in hate crimes and violence against members of the AAPI community. Printfresh founder Amy Voloshin and her team believe in using this platform to spread awareness of the issues and offer ways to provide support.

March 2021
Stop Asian Hate: Resources to Educate and Empower Allies
Stop Asian Hate: Resources to Educate and Empower Allies

Over the past year, it’s been heartbreaking to see our friends and business partners experience increased xenophobia and racism during this already challenging time. As a company, we actively stand against these hateful aggressions, and it’s important to us that we use this platform to amplify thoughtful voices and spread awareness of these issues. 

We’re sharing some resources that have helped us deepen our understanding and navigate how we can best support the Asian American community right now.

To learn about current events and issues:

Stop Asian Hate

The site is a self-proclaimed work-in-progress space to centralize information and important links in support of the #StopAsianHate movement. This means it is being updated frequently with additional information. They break resources into three steps: 

1. Read about the current crisis of anti-Asian hate and violence

2. Raise awareness by sharing information with the media and your circle

3. Commit to anti-racist action by volunteering at, donating to, and advocating for all marginalized people

NextShark

According to their website, NextShark “is a leading source covering Asian American News and Asian News including business, culture, entertainment, politics, tech, and lifestyle. We strive to provide the best and up-to-date coverage for our communities all over the world.”

The May Lee Show 

You can “join award-winning, international journalist, May Lee, as she sits down with the most impactful and relevant Asian and Asian Americans who are boldly enhancing and elevating Asian voices and issues around the world.” Consider starting with episode 56, “What is a Hate Crime?”  and episode 57 “Georgia Shootings” to learn more about the issues members of the AAPI community are currently facing. Photo above credited to: The May Lee Show 

Asian Arts Initiative

Located in Philadelphia’s Chinatown North, Asian Arts Initiative is a multidisciplinary arts center offering exhibitions, performances, artist residencies, youth workshops, and a community gathering space. The organization supports art that amplifies Asian American experiences, cultivates youth leaders through arts education programs, and calls attention to issues facing local communities of color. They also activate the neighborhood community as partners in imagining new realities for collective social change and empowerment.

Joy Cho

Oh Joy! founder Joy Cho has a highlight on her Instagram with stories and resources. She shares important statistics, books you can read, and personal accounts of how racism is experienced by individuals.

Sonja Rasula

Entrepreneur Sonja Rasula eloquently provides information on the issues facing the AAPI community via her Instagram. She writes “Asians and Asian Americans are being traumatized and targeted for a global pandemic; it’s wrong and hateful and ignorant. If you see something, say something. Check your own privilege and miseducation and take some time to educate yourself around Asian American history (The Chinese Exclusion Act, Japanese Internment/Concentration Camps, the minority model myth, the fetishization of Asian women, the emasculation of Asian men, +).” Photo above credited to: Sonja Rasula

Donate to support the AAPI community:

AAPI Community Fund 

A Go Fund Me to support the AAPI Community Fund has been created. To date, they are just shy of their $4M fundraising goal. The funds raised will be distributed to organizations “that empower and uplift the AAPI community, with initiatives such as increased community safety and support for those affected by violence.”

AAPI Women Lead 

“AAPI Women Lead and  #ImReady Movement aims to strengthen the progressive political and social platforms of Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the US through the leadership of self-identified AAPI women and girls.” Your donations will allow the organization to continue its research and share more stories. 

Asian Americans Advancing Justice (AAJC)

Since 1991 AAJC has advocated on behalf of Asian Americans in national policy conversations. Your support will directly help “fight to advance civil and human rights for Asian Americans, build a fair and just society for all, and equip Asian American youth to become tomorrow’s leaders.”

Red Canary Song

Red Canary Song is the only grassroots Chinese massage parlor worker coalition in the U.S. They began their work in 2017 after the death of a Flushing spa worker who was killed in a police raid. Over 9000 massage parlors exist in the US and their workers lack access to political representation, labor rights and collective organizing.

Chinese Immigrant Family Wellness Initiative (CIFWI)

The Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation (PCDC) and Hall-Mercer have partnered to develop The Chinese Immigrant Family Wellness Initiative (CIFWI), which aims to introduce mental and emotional health as a key component of health for the Chinese immigrant community. Your financial support can send a care package, connect a family in need of help or sponsor a wellness workshop. 

CAAAV

CAAAV works to build grassroots community power across diverse poor and working class Asian immigrant and refugee communities in New York City. The organization was founded in 1986 by a group of working class women who were alarmed at the spike in violence on Asian communities which was attributed to racism. 

Asian Mosaic Fund

The Asian Mosaic Fund Giving Circle is a diverse group of multi-generational supporters committed to advancing the well-being of the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities in Greater Philadelphia. You can become a member and help organizations that are making an impact on the local Asian community. Members (donors over $50) vote to fund grant opportunities.

Shop from AAPI owned businesses:

Sabbatical Beauty  

Based in Philadelphia, this Korean skincare company has been talked about in major publications from Allure to Cosmopolitan. Take their skincare quiz and learn about the best products for your skin. 

Peggy Li

Her pieces have been seen on TV shows like The Bold Type, Dead to Me, and The Bachelorette but they’re also affordable enough for you to wear every day. Proceeds from her Year of the Ox necklace benefit the Stop Asian Hate Campaign. You might need to be patient as due to overwhelming demand necklace orders placed after 3/17 won’t ship until April. In the meantime check out these gorgeous rainbow huggies or the Khaleesi ring.

Rikumo 

Rikumo is a lifestyle brand that celebrates Japanese craftsmanship, design, and aesthetics. Based in Philadelphia, they connect Japanese artisans and craftsmen with an international public that values quality, craftsmanship, and simplicity in design. Photo above credited to: Rikumo

Kinn Studio

Founder Jennie Yoon says “I started Kinn to replace the antique jewelry my parents lost when their home was robbed. In honor of those priceless heirlooms, we design classic pieces at Kinn that stand the test of time.” For the entire month of March, Yoon is donating 10% of the proceeds from her sales to Stop AAPI Hate and AAPI Women Lead. 

Sandy Liang

From Hayley Williams of Paramore or Aidy Bryant and Chloe Sevigny, many have worn Sandy Liang’s designs. Liang might be best known for elevating fleece from Old Navy Bargain to something tres chic. Her pieces feature bold colors, flowers, and animal prints.

Object & Totem

Julianne Ahn started Object & Totem in 2011 as an independent ceramic studio. Currently based in Brooklyn, the studio produces one of a kind vases, limited edition vessels, select tableware and small sculptures for both functional and decorative use.

If you see something, say something:

Being an ally can mean going beyond educating yourself and actively working to support members of the AAPI community.

Hollaback bystander intervention training

These free, online trainings are designed to equip people to respond to, prevent and intervene in instances of harassment. While the training is free and open to the public, you can hire Hollaback to create custom training for your organization or donate to support their work. Photo above credited to: Hollaback!

Victims and witnesses of hate crimes can also report what they are experiencing and seeing. Stop AAPI Hate and Asian Americans Advancing Justice are asking that people share these stories. 

If you are a victim of a hate crime and need additional mental health support, the Asian Mental Health Collective has put together a directory to help you find a therapist. 

Featured Image by Jason Leung on Unsplash

0 comments